How to Use Cursive Fonts in Your Blog Design

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posted on: October 8, 2017

Adding a cursive font is the perfect touch to a blog brand. They bring personality and character while reflecting the approachability to one’s content. Cursive fonts are so popular that I’m sure you see them on your Pinterest feed.

Unfortunately, bloggers frequently use these fonts in a way that reflects poorly on their brand. The fonts appear unprofessional – leaving a clear DIY-vibe to the graphics. These tips are my best practices for using cursive fonts in one’s blog branding, plus I’ve included my favorite twelve cursive fonts!

One is Just Enough

Here’s where most people make the mistake – they use several different fonts. For example, one cursive font might be used for their logo and then a completely different one for their blog post templates.

You want to find one signature cursive font that will last your brand years. Most sites allow you to put in a sample text, so you can see how things come together before you purchase. Find one font that will last you three years. I recommend checking out MyFonts first then Creative Market. More designers tend to use MyFonts, and they have licenses for the web. Creative Market is not as regulated as MyFonts. Plus, Creative Market is extremely popular with DIY-bloggers.

Guarantee Readability

Cursive fonts can be difficult to read, so use them for large headings, i.e. blog post templates and on-brand messaging like subscribe, about, etc. Cursive fonts can be hard to read for some readers. Since everything should be clear and concise, select a highly readable cursive font. A few sites like The Cookie Rookie include the font within the design. When I use a cursive web font, I use it sparingly and with terms that are easy to read and universal.

Limit Typography Edits

You might try to adjust the space between the letters, kerning. With cursive fonts, you rarely want to adjust the kerning. Script fonts are meant to connect and look handwritten. Often, people tend to spread these out too much, so that the cursive letters don’t connect. In Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator, you would make these edits under the Character window.

Align With Brand Values

When determining what cursive font to use with your brand, the font’s characteristics should align with your overall brand goals and values. This approach reassures that your values are embodied in your content as well as your design. Fonts reflect different values depending on the typographic features (thickness, shape, form).

Do you have any questions about cursive fonts? I’d love to hear your feedback! If you are interested in learning more about typography, make sure to subscribe to my design newsletter here!

The Best Cursive Fonts for Your Blog Design

Editor's Note

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Discussion

Avi Takiyar says:

Thank you for your advice. Must say, you have got a nice website design, clean and minimalist.

Jen Ricardo says:

Lindsay dear, thanks for these great tips. They are really useful, I must say that you are right and that many people comment the great error of separating the kerning in the italics. By the way … I love the refreshing design of your blog. XOXO

    Lindsay Humes says:

    Kerning on cursive lettering bothers me the most! Thanks for your kind words about my design!

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